2020 Election

Community colleges can play a key role in increasing civic engagement and voter participation in the upcoming election. For information about the 2020 General Election, visit the Secretary of State's website at vote.ca.gov.

IMPORTANT DATES 
The voter registration deadline is 15 days before the election: Monday, October 19th. Counties will be sending out ballots, and early voting begins 29 days prior to the election: Monday, October 5th. The final day of voting is Tuesday, November 3rd. If your ballot is postmarked by November 3rd, it has up to 17 days to arrive in the county registrar’s office and it will be counted.

For tips on supporting candidates and campaigns, see the resources below.

If you missed the League’s virtual town hall with Secretary of State Alex Padilla on how to engage California Community Colleges in the 2020 general election, you can view the webinar recording here. To access the PowerPoint, slides click on the links below.


As the 2020 General Election approaches, California voters will soon be asked to determine the fate of two important ballot measures that could significantly impact community colleges: Propositions 15 and 16. 

Prop 15

Prop 15 seeks to raise much-needed revenue to invest in schools and vital services for communities across California. The Schools & Communities First Initiative will be a key component to the state’s recovery and reinvestment, delivering nearly $500 million each year to California’s community colleges.  

To learn more about Prop 15 and how California Community Colleges can take an active role in educating voters, watch our virtual town hall with Senator Connie Leyva.


Prop 15 Toolkit 

Below the League has gathered a toolkit to support California Community Colleges. For more information visit the Yes on Prop 15 website.

 

Prop 16

Prop 16 would reverse the ban on equal opportunity policies like affirmative action with the goal of eliminating discrimination in state contracts, hiring, and college admissions. A report by the Campaign for College Opportunity demonstrated that in 2016-17, only 25% of our tenured faculty were African American or Latino, despite those populations making up a majority of our student body. Research indicates that students are more likely to be academically successful when taught by faculty from similar backgrounds; thus, the passage of Prop 16 would likely result in an increase in student access, success, and equity. 

To learn more about Prop 16 and how California Community Colleges can take an active role in educating voters, watch our virtual town hall with Assemblymember Evan Low.


Prop 16 Toolkit

Below the League has gathered a toolkit to support California Community Colleges. For more information, visit the Yes on Prop 16 website.

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